Homily for the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C (3)

Homily for the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C

Theme: Blessed and cursed way of life.

By: Rev Fr Stephen ‘Dayo Osinkoya

Homily for Sunday February 13 2022

Jeremiah 17:5-8
Psalm 1:1-4, 6
I Corinthians 15:12, 16-20
Luke 6:17, 20-26







Homily for the 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C

Theme: Blessed and cursed way of life.

By: Rev Fr Stephen ‘Dayo Osinkoya

Homily for Sunday February 13 2022

 

Jeremiah 17:5-8
Psalm 1:1-4, 6
I Corinthians 15:12, 16-20
Luke 6:17, 20-26

Our liturgy today in the first and the gospel readings presents us with the Blessed and cursed way of life. This affords us the opportunity to reflect and ask “what way of life am I living?”

Nonetheless, the Beatitudes are highly provocative. They constitute a series of oxymorons: the holding together of two concepts that clash or are at odds with one another. It is outrageous in any age to congratulate the poor on being poor, the hungry on being hungry, the weeping and the reviled on being in the condition they are in. Correspondingly, it appears foolish to declare unfortunate (for that is what ‘Woe!’ signifies) the wealthy, the well-fed (‘the full’), the laughing and those who enjoy a good reputation. Other things being equal, these states are perfectly desirable.

But in the vision of Jesus other things are not equal at all. The Beatitudes and the Woes only make sense in the light of the coming reversal of fortune to be brought about by God (this is a prominent theme in Luke’s view of salvation). They have a clear anticipation in the canticle of Mary, the Magnificat: He casts the mighty from their thrones and raises the lowly. He fills the starving with good things, sends the rich away empty (Luke 1:51-53)

The second reading continues Paul’s reminder to the Corinthian community about the resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:12, 16-20). Belief in the resurrection of Jesus cannot be separated from belief in the resurrection of all those ‘in Christ’, that is, believers. His resurrection is the hope and pledge of a more general resurrection to come. This Second Reading thus joins the first and the gospel readings in its sense of God’s faithfulness. God’s raising of Christ necessarily implies that God will be faithful in raising those ‘in Christ’ – believers – as well.

Why are the rich cursed? Wealth as contained in these passages is seen as an instrument of oppression and intimidation of the poor and less privileged. How many are people who believe their wealth and position in the society can make them have their way at the expense and to the detriment of the poor. It is not to see the rich, the wealthy and the elites would not make heaven. But trusting so much in wealth, position and power to the point of having no trust in God is by itself a curse and that is where the destruction of the soul comes from. For the soul that is estranged from God, its creator is a cursed soul.

We all are therefore to keep in mind our ultimate destiny and use the created goods in manners that promote and protect the dignity of persons and glorify God.

*Rev Fr Stephen ‘Dayo Osinkoya*

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