January 18, 2020

Catholic For Life

Preaching the Santity of Human Life and the Gospel Message

YEAR A: HOMILY FOR THE 2ND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME (2)

Blessed Lamb! on Calv'ry's mountain Slain to take our sins away: Let the drops of that rich fountain Our tremendous ransom pay: Sacred Savior! Sacred Savior! Lowly at Thy feet we pray.

YEAR A: HOMILY FOR THE 2ND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME HOMILY THEME: FOLLOW THE LAMB OF GOD; LEAD SAINTLY LIVES BY: Rev. Fr. Jacob Aondover ATSU HOMILY: READINGS: ISAIAH 49:3.5-6,

YEAR A: HOMILY FOR THE 2ND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

HOMILY THEME: FOLLOW THE LAMB OF GOD; LEAD SAINTLY LIVES

BY: Rev. Fr. Jacob Aondover ATSU

 

HOMILY: READINGS: ISAIAH 49:3.5-6, PSALM 40, 1CORINTHIANS 1:1-3, JOHN 1:29-34

God had established covenants with his chosen people Israel from Abraham to the era of kings. Through Abraham, all the families of the earth were to be blessed (Gen. 12:3b); this would only be a possibility through the promised Messiah, a descendant of Abraham, Jesus Christ, the saviour of the world. As Israel waited for the Messiah who’d bring blessings to them, God constantly reminded them that he was always with them and someday, there liberation would come. He further stressed that the coming Messiah would be the light of the nations taking his salvation to the ends of the earth (Isa. 49:6). He would save the whole of creation and raise up not only the fallen tribes of Jacob but indeed all the fallen nations of the world. He would not only restore to God the preserved of Israel but also all peoples of the world.

Beloved in Christ, all of us have been sanctified in Jesus and called to be saints with all who profess the name of Christ (1Cor.1:2). We have been saved by the Messiah, a saving that comes with a responsibility, ‘that we be saints’. Being saints entail following the Lamb of God shown to us today by John the Baptist (Jn. 1:29). This is true because sainthood is not only a consequence of God’s grace but of sinlessness too. Jesus, the Lamb of God alone has the power of washing off our sins. Unlike the Passover lamb of Exodus 12:7 which had no part in taking away the sins of men, Jesus, the servant of God is the Lamb led to the slaughter (Isa. 53:7b) for the purpose of the sanctification of the human race.

Jesus, my brothers and sisters instantiated the salvation promised by God. He came as light shinning in the darkness and the darkness couldn’t overcome it (Jn. 1:5). He came as a restorer of fallen humanity; as a leader of a new race, the race of those pursuing heaven. He came to placate, propitiate or mollify the raging anger of God over man, given man’s disobedience. God fulfilled his promise of sending us a Messiah by letting his Son come to us as a saviour and redeemer. The joy of beholding him made Simeon chant his Nunc Dimittis servum tuum (Now thou dost dismiss thy servant) (Lk. 2:29-32); for he knew that the world would never remain in captivity, but saved.

Like the saintly Simeon, and the many devout Christians down the ages, may I charge us to thank and bless God for the gift of Jesus, the light of the world. May we thank him for giving us a brother, one like us, a neighbour next door, our mentor and guide. We may thank him for coming to give us life and life to the full (Jn. 10:10). In the midst of our trials, hardships, sufferings, unfulfilled desires, poverty, hunger, sicknesses, etc, let still thank him for giving us Jesus, our perfect High Priest who is able to sympathize with our weaknesses (Heb. 4:15) and the pillar of our faith. No matter how long we have to wait for God, may we never forget to keep at it, for whenever he comes our blessing is assured.

In the words of Saint Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians 1:3, may I pray that the “Grace and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ be with you now and always” as you FEED AND EDUCATE ONE. Amen.

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